5 Delicious Spam Recipes

Oct 24

Have a lone can of Spam in your pantry? Not sure what to do with it? Here are 5 delicious Spam recipes that I recommend to help you make delicious meals!

And for more reading about Spam, be sure to read up on “Why Do Hawaiians Love Spam?

1. Spam Musubi

One does not mention Spam recipes without mentioning the king of them all: the Spam musubi! Spam musubis make a great snack and can be found at almost all convenience stores in Hawaii.

spam musubi

The recipe: The Spam musubi is extremely easy to figure out: it’s just cooked rice and Spam wrapped with dried seaweed (also known as nori). Some people also marinate the SPAM in teriyaki sauce (basically soy sauce + sugar) or add a block of scrambled egg under the SPAM slice. Some people also sprinkle furikake (salty mixture of ground & dried fish, seaweed and sesame seeds) on the rice. Some people also use rice vinegar for the rice, which is a traditional sushi technique.

SPAM musubi recipe at SeriousEats.com

You might also want to pick up a Musubi Maker if you want to make this at home. Otherwise, it’s very difficult to make a rice block.

 

2. Spam Fried Rice

spam fried rice

Photo by: jeffreyw

My favorite Spam recipe is fried rice. I love my fried rice recipe, which is based on Chinese-style fried rice and all my friends compliment it whenever I cook it for them. Spam and any processed meats (hot dogs, breakfast sausages, Portuguese sausages, etc.) are always great when diced up and browned on a skillet.

My fried rice recipe is adapted from a recipe by Chef Martin Yan, that jovial, Chinese chef you see on the TV. The key to this Spam recipe is to use leftover rice because fresh rice is too wet and sticky to cook with! Let your fridge dehydrate your rice overnight.

The Hawaii Plan’s Fried Rice Recipe

Preparation time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: 8 minutes
Yield: 4 Servings

  • 3 tbsp cooking oil
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp pepper
  • 3 cups of cooked, leftover rice (break up the clumps first!)
  • 3/4 cup of Spam (in chunks or in strips)
  • 3/4 cup chopped veggies (peas, carrots, cucumber, bell peppers, onions, etc)
  • 1 tbsp oyster sauce or 1 1/2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 4 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 garlic pieces (skin removed and sliced or cracked open)

Step 1. Put skillet on high heat. Add 1 tbsp oil and very lightly scramble eggs, salt, and pepper. Put eggs on the side on a plate or cup. Only lightly scramble them because we will put them back in later and cook them some more.

Step 2. Put 2 tbsp oil in and let it heat up to medium-high heat. Add the garlic and spam. Let it lightly brown. The garlic fragrance should fill your kitchen too. Then add in your rice (de-clumped). Add the oyster sauce or soy sauce evenly and stir everything.

Step 3. As you cook your rice, it should start to soak up the oyster sauce or soy sauce and may get a little crisp too, since leftover rice is not very wet. But stir occasionally, as you don’t want your rice to burn. Finally, add in your veggies, your green onion, and your eggs back in.

Optional: Fried rice is really a flexible dish, so you can add anything you like! I personally like to add cayenne pepper and bits of ginger. Some of my friends like fried rice with ketchup. To each, their own!

Did you like the Chinese flavor of this recipe? Be sure to pick up Martin Yan’s Chinese cookbook, “Chinese Cooking for Dummies.” It’s what I read to understand Chinese cooking and it has many other wonderful recipes like Mapo Tofu, Chow Mein, Kung Pao Chicken, and Honey Garlic Chicken.

 

3. The Hot Hawaiian Breakfast: Spam, eggs, and rice

spam eggs rice

Photo by: bingbing

Spam, eggs, and rice is what I like to call “The Hot Hawaiian Breakfast.” This recipe is just a local interpretation of the sausage, egg, and hash brown breakfast that is popular on the mainland.

Here’s a fun fact: Spam, eggs, and rice is so popular in Hawaii that both McDonalds and Burger King have it on their breakfast menus.

Photo by Bill & Vicki TraceyAnd here’s proof, for those that don’t believe me!

Whenever it’s cold outside, eating this for breakfast is guaranteed to warm up your soul and get you ready for the day. And don’t forget the ketchup!

The recipe: you don’t really need a recipe for this Spam recipe. Just cook rice in a pot and your eggs and spam in a skillet.

 

4. Budae Jjigae, or “Army Base Stew”

I worked in South Korea for 2 years and ate many great dishes there (most of which are waaaay too spicy for a guy raised in Hawaii). Of all the great Korean food I tried, my favorite was budae jjigae (부대찌개), a stew with a variety of things thrown in.

budae jjigae

Photo by Jay del Corro

Budae jjigae was originally made by Koreans after the Korean War. The Koreans did not have much food and ate a lot of what was available from the U.S. military base there, which was mostly low-quality foods like Spam, hot dogs, and instant noodles (wiki). With what they had, the Koreans made a new stew. Although it was a very low-budget food, it actually tasted great and Koreans continued to make it even after Korea had recovered from the war. Today, it is a dish commonly ordered in Korean restaurants.

Budae jjigae recipe at GroupRecipes.com

Did you know that Koreans love Spam too? Outside of the US, they are the biggest Spam consumer. Spam gift sets are very popular choices for gifts during the Korean holiday season. “Mah-shiit-dah!” — it means “delicious” in Korean!

 

5. The Spamwich

Because of it’s rectangular-size and because it’s so easy to slice, SPAM can easily be used for a sandwich. You can make whatever type of sandwich you want with SPAM, but I highly recommend that you cook your SPAM first. It is a hassle and not necessary because Spam is already cooked, but Spam is just not the same treat we all know and love when it comes straight from the can.

When cooking Spam, I recommend just frying it in a pan over low to medium heat. Spam naturally has a lot of fat, which will melt and lubricate the pan when it is heated. Ideally, you want your Spam a crimson color, with a crispy outside.

SPAM Reuben recipe at RecipeSource.com

Spamwich

Photo by: jeffreyw

Honorable Mention: Breakfast Skillet

from spam.com

I saw this lovely, Spam breakfast dish on Spam.com and had to mention it here. As you may have noticed from the other recipes, Spam can be easily substituted into any recipe where there are sausages or hot dogs or bacon. The same goes here with this Breakfast Skillet recipe.

Hearty Spam Breakfast Skill recipe @ Spam.com

 

Dishonorable Mention: Spam Apple Turnover

from Spam.com

Wait… what?

Apple Spam Turnover Recipe @ Spam.com

 

Want more Spam?

I personally only know a handful of recipes that use Spam. However, there are endless with this beautiful, culinary treat. If you want more Spam ideas and recipes, take a look at the Spam cookbook, Hawaii Cooks With Spam by Muriel Miura available on Amazon.com.

About the Author : Ron Lum

Ron has been living in Hawaii since the age of 5. He studied accounting at the University of Hawaii. He worked as an English teacher in South Korea for 2 years before becoming a freelancing web designer. His interests include money, psychology, Game of Thrones, and the DOTA video game. Find him on

4 Comments

  • [...] Spam musubi is the best local snack. It’s a slice of Spam on top of a block of rice and wrapped in nori (Japanese seaweed paper). I’ve written several articles about Spam already on this blog, including Why Do Hawaiians Love Spam? and 5 Delicious Spam Recipes. [...]

    Reply
  • [...] thehawaiiplan.com [...]

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  • Your fried recipe is to die for! I made it for my husband… He loves it!

    Reply
  • [...] 5 Delicious Spam Recipes – The Hawaii Plan – Have a lone can of Spam in your pantry? Not sure what to do with it? Here are 5 delicious Spam recipes that I recommend to help you make delicious meals!… [...]

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